Advanced Medical Imaging Degree (AM13)  Degree


The Advanced Medical Imaging Associate of Applied Science Degree program provides educational opportunities to the post-graduate registered Radiologic Technologist, registered Radiation Therapist and registered Nuclear Medicine Technologist. It provides the students with the knowledge needed to perform MRI and CT exams and to sit for the Post-Primary Magnetic Resonance Imaging Certification examination and/or the Post-Primary Computed Tomography Certification Examination. The academic component is designed to meet content specifications of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) exam in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography, as well as providing for continuing educational requirements. This Advanced Medical Imaging program consists of online courses as well as clinical education for the student. The clinical component is required to complete competency exams needed to sit for the MRI and CT certification exams.

IMPORTANT: Applicants must be a registered Radiologic Technologist, registered Radiation Therapist or registered Nuclear Medicine Technologist in good standing.

Students are selected on a first come, first serve basis. New students are accepted for Fall Semester. Clinical slots are limited. Clinical education credit will be considered for prior clinical experience.

After applying to ATC, applicants must contact program faculty to determine clinical credit and/or clinical slot placement.

In order to begin the clinical requirements, students must complete a physical form, tuberculosis skin test, supply proof of immunization, undergo a background check, and submit to a drug screen test. Students completing the CT clinical education courses must provide their radiation dose history.

Admission Requirements:

  • Submit a completed application and fee
  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Submit an official high school transcript or High School Equivalency transcript
  • Submit official college transcripts, if applicable
  • Completing entrance examination requirements for Albany Technical College.
  • Minimum Test Scores:
ACCUPLACER NEXT GENERATION– Reading 236 ACCUPLACER – Reading 64
Writing 249 Sentence Skills 64
Quantitative Reasoning 245 Algebra 57

Credits required for graduation: 64

  • Albany Technical College is accredited with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award Associate of Applied Science Degrees, Associate of Science in Nursing Degrees, Diplomas, and Technical Certificates of Credit. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Albany Technical College.
Curriculum Outline (48 hours)
General Education Core
Area I - Language Arts/Communications
ENGL 1101

Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 1101

Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 1101

Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.

3
ECON 1101

Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective

3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics
MATH 1111

Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
PHYS 1111
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101, MATH 1112, MATH 1113 Corequisite: PHYS 1111L

The first course of two algebra and trigonometry based courses in the physics sequence. Topics include material from mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, static equilibrium, elasticity theory, and simple harmonic motion), mechanical waves, theory of heat and heat transfer, and thermodynamics.

3
PHYS 1111
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101, MATH 1112, MATH 1113 Corequisite: PHYS 1111L

The first course of two algebra and trigonometry based courses in the physics sequence. Topics include material from mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion, static equilibrium, elasticity theory, and simple harmonic motion), mechanical waves, theory of heat and heat transfer, and thermodynamics.

3
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts
HUMN 1101
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101

Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.

3
Occupational 48
COMP 1000

Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.

3
MRIM 2300
Corequisites: MRIM 2320, MRIM 2350

Provides knowledge of patient care and assessment, contrast agents, MRI safety, medical ethics and law, cultural diversity, and patient information management. Topics include: MRI history, anatomy, patient care and assessment, MRI safety, instrumentation, MRI fundamentals, and image parameters.

3
MRIM 2320
Corequisites: MRIM 2300, MRIM 2350

Provides knowledge of anatomy, pathology, scanning protocols, contrast administration, and contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck, spine, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and musculoskeletal system. Topics include: anatomy, scanning protocol, MRI safety, image contrast, and image formation. 

3
MRIM 2330
Corequisites: MRIM 2360, MRIM 2370

Introduces the concepts of basic physics and instrumentation for magnetic resonance imaging. Topics include imaging parameters, image quality, MRI Fundamentals, image processing and display, and special procedures. 

3
MRIM 2350
Corequisites: MRIM 2300, MRIM 2320

Introduces students to the magnetic resonance imaging department and provides an opportunity for participation in and observation of MRI procedures. Topics include equipment utilization, contrast medias, exam preparation, patient care and assessment, scanning protocol, image quality and progress toward completion of clinical competency evaluations.

6
MRIM 2360
Corequisites: MRIM 2330, MRIM 2370

Intermediate course that reinforces learning obtained in MRI 110. Topics include exam preparations, patient care and assessment, equipment utilization, image quality, scanning protocol, contrast media, quality control, and progress toward completion of clinical competency evaluations.

6
MRIM 2370
Corequisites: MRIM 2300, MRIM 2320, MRIM 2330

Provides a comprehensive review of patient care, imaging procedures, imaging formation and data acquisition for the magnetic resonance imaging certification exam. Topics include: anatomy, scanning protocol, MRI safety, image contrast, image formation, exam preparation, contrast media, patient care and assessment, equipment utilization, image quality, imaging parameters, MRI fundamentals, image processing and display, and special procedures.

3
RADT 2201
Corequisites: RADT 2220, RADT 2250

Introduces the student to computed tomography and patient care in the CT suite. Topics include: the history of computed tomography, patient care and assessment, anatomy, contrast agents, radiation safety and protection, medical ethics and law, cultural diversity, and patient information management. 

2
RADT 2220
Corequisites: RADT 2201, RADT 2250

Provides knowledge CT procedures of the head, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Topics include: anatomy, pathology, scanning procedures, scanning protocol, contrast administration, and contraindications for computed tomography. 

3
RADT 2250
Corequisites: RADT 2201, RADT 2220

Introduces students to the computed tomography department and provides an opportunity for participation in and observation of CT procedures. Students progress toward completion of clinical competency evaluations. Topics include: exam preparation, patient care, equipment utilization, exposure techniques, evaluation of CT procedures, and incorporation of contrast media. 

4
RADT 2210
Corequisites: RADT 2230, RADT 2265

Introduces the concepts of basic physics and instrumentation for computed tomography. Topics include: computer concepts, system operation and components, image processing and display, instrumentation, single slice and volume scanning, 3-D volume rendering, image quality and artifacts, radiation protection and quality control.

5
RADT 2230
Corequisites: RADT 2210, RADT 2265

Provides knowledge of anatomy, pathology, scanning protocols, contrast administration, and contraindications for computed tomography of the neck, spine, musculoskeletal system, and special procedures. Post-processing and quality assurance criteria are addressed. Topics include: anatomy, pathology, scanning protocol, contrast administration and contraindications, post processing and quality assurance.

3
RADT 2265
Corequisites: RADT 2210, RADT 2230

Provides students with continued computed tomography work experience. Students demonstrate increased proficiency levels in skills introduced in Computed Tomography Procedures and practiced in the previous clinical course. Students complete clinical competency evaluations. Topics include: exam preparation, patient care, equipment utilization, exposure techniques, evaluation of CT procedures, and incorporation of contrast media.

4
Faculty
Click to view profile for LeAnn S. Watson
Program Chair

Program Chair, Radiologic Technology
Healthcare Technology Building

Click to view profile for Kathryn Daniels
Advisor

Radiologic Technology, Instructor
Healthcare Technology Building

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