Pharmacy Technology Degree (PT23)  Degree


Program Description:

The Pharmacy Technology degree is designed to provide an individual with the entry level skills required for success in a retail pharmacy or a hospital-based pharmacy department. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention and replacement. Graduates are prepared to function as pharmacy technicians in positions requiring preparations of medications according to prescription under the supervision of a pharmacist.

Entrance date:

  • Core courses: Each semester
  • Occupationally specific courses: Each semester
  • Program admission requirements:

Minimum Test Scores

ACCUPLACER – Sentence Skills 70 COMPASS – Writing 62
Reading Comp. 64 Reading 79
Elem. Algebra 57 Algebra 37
  • High School diploma or equivalent required for admission.
  • Applicant must be at least 16 years old.
  • In addition, students must be at least 17 years old at the start of their practicum experience.
  • Every program graduate is at least 18 years of age, and is a high school graduate, or possesses a high school equivalency certificate.
  • Applicant must submit a satisfactory criminal record check and must pass drug screening before starting the practicum courses.
  • Documentation of a negative tuberculosis skin test or chest X-ray is required for orientation and every six months while enrolled in the program.

Credits Required for Graduation: 65


Job Outlook:

The employment of pharmacy technicians is projected to grow 4 percent from 2020 to 2030, slower than the average for all occupations.

  • 2017 Median Pay: $35,100 per year; $16.87/hour
  • Number of jobs 2020: 419,300
  • Job Outlook: 2016-26: 4% (slower than average)
  • Employment Change: 2020-30: 16,600

Employment

Despite limited employment growth, about 31,700 openings for pharmacy technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Year of Graduation Number of Students Taking the Exam Pass Rate After First Attempt
Spring 2021 1 100%
Fall 2020 1 100%
Spring 2019 1 100%
Fall 2019 4 100%
Spring 2019 2 50% (1)
Fall 2018 7 86% (6)
Spring 2018 9 67% (6)
Fall 2017 9 78% (7)
Spring 2017 9 78% (7)
Fall 2016 9 56% (5)

General Education Core Courses 15 credits
Area I - Language Arts/Communications
ENGL 1101

Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.

3
Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 1101

Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.

3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics
MATH 1111

Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.

3
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts
HUMN 1101
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101

Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.

3
Program-Specific Gen. Ed. Course Requirements
Non General Education Courses 8 credits
BIOL 2113
Corequisite: BIOL 2113L

Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2113
Corequisite: BIOL 2113L

Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.

3
BIOL 2114
Prerequisites: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L Corequisite: BIOL 2114L

Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
BIOL 2114
Prerequisites: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L Corequisite: BIOL 2114L

Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.

3
Occupational Courses 42 credits
COMP 1000

Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.

3
ALHS 1040

Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: basic life support/CPR, basic emergency care/first aid and triage, vital signs, infection control/blood and air-borne pathogens.

3
ALHS 1090

Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.

2
PHAR 1000
Prerequisites: MATH 1111, MATH 1012

This course develops knowledge and skills in pharmaceutical calculations procedures. Topics include: systems of measurement, medication dispensing calculations, pharmacy mathematical procedures, and calculation tools and techniques.

4
PHAR 1010

Provides an overview of the pharmacy technology field and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation in the pharmacy field. Topics include: safety, orientation to the pharmacy technology field, Fundamental principles of chemistry, basic laws of chemistry, ethics and laws, definitions and terms, and reference sources.

5
PHAR 1040

The course introduces the students to principles and knowledge about all classifications of medication. Topics include: disease states and treatment modalities, pharmaceutical side effects and drug interactions, control substances, specific drugs, and drug addiction and abuse.

4
PHAR 1020
Prerequisites: PHAR 1000, PHAR 1010

This course introduces the student to principles of receiving, storing, and dispensing medications. Topics include: purchasing, packaging, and labeling drugs; pharmacy policies and procedures; documentation; inventory and filing systems; compounding; storage and control; pharmacy equipment; and health care organizational structure. This course provides laboratory and clinical practice.

4
PHAR 1030
Prerequisites: PHAR 1000, PHAR 1010

Continues the development of student knowledge and skills in preparing medication, processing glassware, and maintaining an aseptic environment. Topics include: aseptic and sterile techniques, parenteral admixtures, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, filtering, disinfecting, contamination, ophthalmic preparations, infection control, and quality control.

4
PHAR 1050
Corequisites: PHAR 1020, PHAR 1030

Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experiences with the basic skills necessary for the pharmacy technician. Topics include: storage and control, documentation, inventory and billing, community practice, institutional practice, and communication,

5
PHAR 2060
Prerequisites: COMP 1000, PHAR 1030, PHAR 1050

This course presents the advanced concepts and principles needed in the pharmacy technology field. Topics include: physician orders, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, job readiness, legal requirements, inventory and billing, pharmaceutical calculations review and pharmacology review.

3
PHAR 2070
Prerequisites: COMP 1000, PHAR 1030, PHAR 1050

Continues the development of student knowledge and skills applicable to pharmacy technology practice. Topics include: dispensing responsibilities, physician orders, controlled substances, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, ophthalmic preparations, and hospital/retail/home health pharmacy techniques.

5
Faculty
Click to view profile for JaNee Mobley
Program Chair

Chair of Pharmacy Technology

Advisor

Clinical Coordinator Pharmacy Technology

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